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Poetry > The Galilee Hitch-Hiker


San Francisco, California: White Rabbit Press, 1958
Limited Edition: 200 copies
8.5" x 6.75"; 16 pages
Red wrappers with title and illustration printed in black
Sewn binding
Printed by Joe Dunn, founder of White Rabbit Press.
Reportedly, some or all copies were printed using the printing presses at the Greyhound Bus Company in San Francisco where Dunn worked as a printer.
Graham Mackintosh inscribed a copy of the book confirming this printing history (see below).

Colophon Statement
THE WHITE RABBIT PRESS
1515 Jackson St. San Francisco 9
May 58
THIS EDITION LIMITED TO 200 COPIES
THE COVER IS BY KENN DAVIS
all rights reserved

Front Cover
Front cover illustration by Kenn Davis. Of his work, Davis said,

Feedback from Kenn Davis
Kenn Davis. Telephone interview. 16 and 17 April 2002.
Reported Variants
Red wrappers with white outer parchment wrapper
Title printed in black on front wrapper
Title and illustration printed in black on front parchment wrapper

Front cover White wrappers with no outer parchment wrapper
Kenn Davis drawing and book title printed in black on front wrapper

Reported stapled binding on first edition, possibly for advance or remainder copies.

Reprinted
Richard Price: Hippie Drawings. Germany: Hatje Cantz Velag, 2005. n. p.
A catalog of Price's drawings, published in conjunction with an exhibition at Sadie Coles HQ, London.
First edition 3,000 copies
Includes all nine parts of Brautigan's poem

First published May 1958, The Galilee Hitch-Hiker, a single poem with nine separately titled parts each with a common theme of the changing presence of Charles Baudelaire, was Brautigan's second poetry book publication.

A notation at end of poem states "San Francisco February 1958."

All nine parts of The Galilee Hitch-Hiker were collected and reprinted in The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster.

Production and Distribution
The impetus for White Rabbit Press came from a suggestion by Jack Spicer following the Sunday, 9 June 1957 Poetry as Magic Workshop. Spicer suggested to Joe Dunn, one of the original members, that he start a press to publish the writing of workshop members. Soon afterwards, Dunn founded the White Rabbit Press and began publishing chapbooks from author's typescripts. The eighth chapbook published was Brautigan's The Galilee Hitch-Hiker.

White Rabbit Press had no binding capabilities so the printed contents of the book were delivered to Brautigan in boxes. "We sat around and needle and threaded the copies together, drinking wine and yakking," said Davis. Next was the problem of distribution." City Lights would take a few," said Davis,

Feedback from Kenn Davis
Kenn Davis. Telephone interview. 16 and 17 April 2002 and Letter to John F. Barber. 9 June 2004.

Copy inscribed to Don Allen
This copy is for Don
Richard Brautigan
December 16, 1966

Copy inscribed is the O'ar edition
Copy inscribed to Peter Cohon
For Peter Cohon,
A Saint in his own time,
Richard Brautigan
Copy inscribed by Graham Mackintosh attests to the book's printing history
Printed by
Joe Dunn
at Greyhound
Graham Mackintosh
Copy inscribed to Robert Junsch
This copy just is      
wishing and concerned one more week. Let's see what happens. Why
not? (happiness + happiness)

Richard Brautigan
Stinson Beach
September 8, 1984

Bob, Shallen, Eric Triston
Junsch was Brautigan's long-time friend and neighbor in Bolinas, California.
The date of this inscription is just one week prior to Brautigan's death.
Copy inscribed to Susan [Morgan]
This copy is for Susan
Richard Brautigan
January 28, 1967

Brautigan met Althea Susan Morgan, Friday, 27 January 1967. He gave her this inscribed Oar edition copy the following day.
From the collection of Sara and Travis Warwick. Used by permission.
Copy inscribed to Susan [?]
This copy is for Susan
Richard Brautigan
December 16, 1966

Copy inscribed is an O'ar edition
From the collection of Gregory Miller. Used by permission.

San Francisco, California: The Cranium Press/O'ar Books, 1966

15 pages
Red printed wrappers without outer parchment wrapper of first edition
Stapled binding
A reprint of the earlier White Rabbit edition
Published in a Limited Edition of 700 copies plus 16 numbered and signed copies.
Brautigan signed each of the 16 numbered copies in blue pencil and drew a small picture of a fish. Brautigan gave away remainder unbound sheets on the streets of San Francisco.
The publisher's name appeared variously as "O'er," "Oar," "or," and "Awwrrrr."

Colophon Statement
The first edition of this book
was printed by Joe Dunn
of the White Rabbit Press
in May 1958. This edition is limited
to 700 copies,
with a small vaguely amusing drawing
of a fish by the author.
The cover is by Kenn Davis.
An or book
published by David Sandberg
in December 1966
Printed at Cranium Press
642 Shrader Street
San Francisco

NOTE: The publisher's name appeared here as "or." Although credited to Sanberg, the book was actually the work of Clifford Burke, a painter, who ran his Cranium Press in a garage at 642 Shrader Street.

Promotional Materials
Handbills issued by O'ar Books announced their reprint and featured a signed drawing of a fish by Brautigan reproduced in facsimile. Printed in black on pale yellow stock.

NOTE: The publisher's name appeared here as both "Oar" and "O'ar."

Carp
Diving Bell
(n. d.)

San Francisco, California: Diving Bell, n.d.
Bootleg reprinting of Sandberg edition on gray paper
Printed wrappers
Diving Bell is reported to have been a small press known for its bootleg reprintings of Beat era books.

Front cover Lotfan In Ketab Ra Bekarid [Please Plant This Book]. Trans. Mehdi Navid and Leila Samadi. Tehran, Iran: Rokhdad-e-No, 2009.
190 pages; ISBN: 978-964-293-5109
Printed wrappers
Front cover illustration by Farhad Fozouni
No translator's preface or other front matter

Reprints all poems from The Galilee Hitch-Hiker, 45 poems from The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster, all poems from Please Plant This Book, 15 poems from June 30th, June 30th, 47 poems from Loading Mercury with a Pitchfork, and 12 poems from Rommel Drives On Deep into Egypt. Specific contents are listed below.

The Galilee Hitch-Hiker
"The Galilee Hitch-Hiker" Part 1
"The American Hotel" Part 2
"1939" Part 3
"The Flowerburgers" Part 4
"The Hour of Eternity" Part 5
"Salvador Dali" Part 6
"A Baseball Game" Part 7
"Insane Asylum" Part 8
"My Insect Funeral" Part 9
The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster
"The Shenevertakesherwatchoff Poem"
"Karma Repair Kit: Items 1-4"
"San Francisco"
"Xerox Candy Bar"
"Discovery"
"Widow's Lament"
"The Pomegranate Circus"
"Love Poem"
"At the California Institute of Technology"
"A Lady"
"The Pumpkin Tide"
"Adrenalin Mother"
"Map Shower"
"December 30"
"The Way She Looks at It"
"Man"
"Your Necklace is Leaking"
"Haiku Ambulance"
"A Candlelion Poem"
"Cyclops"
"It's Raining in Love"
"Poker Star"
"To England"
"Hey! This Is What It's All About"
"I Live in the Twentieth Century"
"The Castle of the Cormorants"
"Lovers"
"Star Hole"
"Albion Breakfast"
"November 3"
"Milk for the Duck"
"The Return of the Rivers"
"A Good-Talking Candle"
"Kafka's Hat"
"Nine Things"
"Mating Saliva"
"Automatic Anthole"
"The Symbol"
"Your Catfish Friend"
"December 24"
"The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster"
"Gee, You're So Beautiful That It's Starting to Rain"
"The Nature Poem"
"In a Cafe"
"Boo, Forever"
Please Plant This Book
"California Native Flowers"
"Shasta Daisy"
"Calendula"
"Sweet Alyssum Royal Carpet"
"Parsley"
"Squash"
"Carrots"
"Lettuce"
June 30th, June 30th
Introduction: "Farewell, Uncle Edward, and All the Uncle Edwards"
"Strawberry Haiku"
"A Short Study in Gone"
"Romance"
"A Study in Roads"
"Floating Chandeliers"
"Japanese Women"
"Sunglasses Worn at Night in Japan"
"Chainsaw"
"Day for Night"
"The Alps"
"Worms"
"Things to Do on a Boring Tokyo Night in a Hotel"
"Taxi Driver"
"What Makes Reality Real"
Loading Mercury with a Pitchfork
CROWS AND MERCURY
"It's Time To Train Yourself"
"Two Guys Get Out of a Car"
"Crow Maiden"
"Information"
"January 4 3"
"They Are Really Having Fun"
"We Meet. We Try. Nothing Happens, But"
"Finding Is Losing Something Else"
"Impasse"
"Ben"
"For Fear You Will Be Alone"
"War Horse"
"'Good Work,' He Said, and"

LOVE
"Everything Includes Us"
"What Happened?"
"I'll Affect You Slowly"
"At The Guess of A Simple Hello"
"Fuck Me Like Fried Potatoes"
"Flowers For A Crow"

SECTION 3
"Have You Ever Been There?"
"I Don't Want To Know about It"

GROUP PORTRAIT WITHOUT THE LIONS
    available light
"Maxine"
"Robot"
"Fred Bought a Pair of Ice Skates"
"Calvin Listens to Starfish"
"Liz Looks at Herself in the Mirror"
"Doris"
"Ginger"
"Vicky Sleeps with Dead People"
"Betty Makes Wonderful Waffles"
"Claudia/1923-1970"
"Walter"
"Morgan"
"Molly"
"'Ah, Great Expectations!'"

GOOD LUCK, CAPTAIN MARTIN
"Good Luck, Captain Martin"
"People Are Constantly Making Entrances"
"The Bottle"
"Small Craft Warnings"
"Famous People and Their Friends"
"Carol the Waitress Remembers Still"
"Put the Coffee On, Bubbles, I'm Coming Home"

FIVE POEMS
"1 / The Curve of Forgotten Things"
"4 / The Shadow of Seven Years' Bad Luck"

MONTANA / 1973
"Night"
"Nine Crows: Two Out of Sequence"

P. S.
"Nobody Knows What the Experience Is Worth"
Rommel Drives On Deep into Egypt
"The Memoirs of Jesse James"
"15%"
"Romeo and Juliet"
"Jules Verne Zucchini"
"All Girls Should Have a Poem"
"30 Cents, Two Transfers, Love"
"Please"
"The Moon Versus Us Ever Sleeping Together Again"
"Color as Beginning"
"All Secrets of Past Tense Have Just Come My Way"
"As the Bruises Fade, the Lightning Aches"
"Rommel Drives On Deep into Egypt"
Det Amerikanska Hotellet. Trans. Peter Falk. Lund: Cavefors, 1976.
"The American Hotel" is Part 2 of The Galilee Hitch-Hiker.

All nine parts of this poem first published in this volume in the order listed below.
All nine parts of this poem were collected and reprinted in The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster.

"The Galilee Hitch-Hiker" Part 1
Baudelaire was
driving a Model A
across Galilee.
He picked up a
hitch-hiker named
Jesus who had
been standing among
a school of fish.
feeding them
pieces of bread.
"Where are you
going?" asked
Jesus, getting
into the front
seat.
"Anywhere, anywhere
out of this world!"
shouted
Baudelaire.
"I'll go with you
as far as
Golgotha,"
said Jesus.
"I have a
concession
at the carnival
there, and I
must be
late."

Textual References
Baudelaire: Charles Baudelaire (1821-67), French poet.
"Jesus. . .fish . . . bread": cf. Matthew 14:13-21.
"Anywhere, anywhere out of this world!": the concluding lines of Baudelaire's prose poem "Anywhere Out of the World" in Paris Spleen (1869).
Golgatha: the site of Jesus' crucifixion. See Matthew 27:33.

Selected Reprintings
Seven Watermelon Suns: Selected Poems of Richard Brautigan. The Cowell Press: University of California at Santa Cruz, 1974.
A speciality press collection of seven works by Brautigan, each printed as a separate 6" x 8.5" broadside with embossed color etchings by Ellen Meske. One of the seven poems reprinted was "The Galilee Hitch-Hiker."
"The American Hotel" Part 2
Baudelaire was sitting
in a doorway with a wino
on San Francisco's skidrow.
The wino was a million
years old and could remember
    dinosaurs.
Baudelaire and the wino
were drinking Petri Muscatel
"One must always be drunk,"
    said Baudelaire.
"I live in the American Hotel,"
said the wino. "And I can
    remember dinosaurs."
"Be you drunken ceaselessly,"
   said Baudelaire.

Textual References
"One must always be drunk . . . Be you drunken ceaselessly": from Baudealire's prose poem "Get Drunk" in Paris Spleen (1869).
"1939" Part 3
Baudelaire used to come
to our house and watch
me grind coffee.
That was in 1939
and we lived in the slums
of Tacoma,
My mother would put
the coffee beans in the grinder.
I was a child
and would turn the handle,
pretending that it was
    a hurdy-gurdy,
and Baudelaire would pretend
that he was a monkey,
hopping up and down
and holding out
a tin cup.
"The Flowerburgers" Part 4
Baudelaire opened
up a hamburger stand
in San Francisco,
but he put flowers
between the buns.
People would come in
and say, "Give me a
hamburger with plenty
of onions on it."
Baudelaire would give
them a flowerburger
instead and the people
would say, "What kind
of a hamburger stand
is this?"

Selected Reprintings
San Francisco Express Times 1(49) December 24, 1968: 8-9.
Published weekly from 24 January 1968 (Vol. 1, no. 1) to 24 December 1968 (Vol. 1, no. 49) as San Francisco Express Times. Continued after as Good Times. Published at 15 Lafayette Street, San Francisco by the Trystero Company. Printed by Waller Press.

Included eleven poems by Brautigan: "The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster," "The Day they Busted the Grateful Dead," "All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace," "Discovery," "At the California Institute of Technology," "Boo, Forever," "The Sidney Greenstreet Blues," "The Flowerburgers Part 4," "A Baseball Game Part 7," "December 24," and "The Garlic Meat Lady."
"The Hour of Eternity" Part 5
"The Chinese
read the time
in the eyes
of cats,"
said Baudelaire
and went into
a jewelry store
on Market Street.
He came out
a few moments
later carrying
a twenty-one
jewel Siamese
cat that he
wore on the
end of a
golden chain.

Textual References
"The Chinese read the time in the eyes of cats": the opening sentence of Baudelaire's prose poem "The Clock" in Paris Spleen (1869).
"Salvador Dali" Part 6
"Are you
or aren't you
going to eat
your soup,
you bloody old
cloud merchant?"
Jeanne Duval
shouted,
hitting Baudelaire
on the back
as he sat
daydreaming
out the window.
Baudelaire was
startled.
Then he laughed
like hell,
waving his spoon
in the air
like a wand
changing the room
into a painting
by Salvador
Dali, changing
the room
into a painting
by Van Gogh.

Textual References
Dali: Spanish surrealist painter (1904-1989).
cloud merchant: see the fourty-fourth prose poem in Baudelaire's Le Spleen de Paris [Paris Spleen], "La Soupe et Les Nuages [The Soup and The Clouds]."
Jeanne Duval: Baudelaire's mulatto mistress and the subject of many of his poems.
Van Gogh: Vincent van Vogh (1853-90), Dutch painter.
"A Baseball Game" Part 7
Baudelaire went
to a baseball game
and bought a hot dog
and lit up a pipe
of opium.
The New York Yankees
were playing
the Detroit Tigers.
In the fourth inning
and angel committed
suicide by jumping
off a low cloud.
The angel landed
on second base,
causing the whole infield
to crack like
a huge mirror.
The game was
called on
account of
fear.

Selected Reprintings
San Francisco Express Times 1(49) December 24, 1968: 8-9.
Published weekly from 24 January 1968 (Vol. 1, no. 1) to 24 December 1968 (Vol. 1, no. 49) as San Francisco Express Times. Continued after as Good Times. Published at 15 Lafayette Street, San Francisco by the Trystero Company. Printed by Waller Press.

Included eleven poems by Brautigan: "The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster," "The Day they Busted the Grateful Dead," "All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace," "Discovery," "At the California Institute of Technology," "Boo, Forever," "The Sidney Greenstreet Blues," "The Flowerburgers Part 4," "A Baseball Game Part 7," "December 24," and "The Garlic Meat Lady."
"Insane Asylum" Part 8
Baudelaire went
to the insane asylum
disguised as a
psychiatrist.
He stayed there
for two months
and when he left,
the insane asylum
loved him so much
that it followed
him all over
California,
and Baudelaire
laughed when the
insane asylum
rubbed itself
up against his
leg like a
strange cat.
"My Insect Funeral" Part 9
When I was a child
I had a graveyard
where I buried insects
and dead birds under
a rose tree.
I would bury the insects
in tin foil and match boxes.
I would bury the birds
in pieces of red cloth.
It was all very sad
and I would cry
as I scooped the dirt
into their small graves
with a spoon.
Baudelaire would come
and join in
my insect funerals,
saying little prayers
the size of
dead birds.
In addition to the specific reviews detailed below, commentary about this book may also be included in General Reviews of Brautigan's work and his place in American literature, or reviews of his Collections.

Bokinsky, Caroline J. "Richard Brautigan." Dictionary of Literary Biography. Vol. 5: American Poets Since World War II. Ed. Donald J. Greiner. Detroit: Gale Research Company, 1980. 96-99.
Critical comments on The Return of the Rivers, The Galilee Hitch-Hiker, Lay the Marble Tea, The Octopus Frontier, All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace, The Pill versus The Springhill Mine Disaster, Rommel Drives on Deep into Egypt, Loading Mercury with a Pitchfork, and June 30th, June 30th. Also provides some biographical and bibliographical information. Says The Return of the Rivers "is an observation of the external world as a surreal, romanticized setting in which the cycle of life is exemplified in the river, sea, rain, and ocean."

READ the full text of this review.
Sorrentino, Gilbert. "Ten Pamphlets." Poetry April 1968: 56-61.
Reviews ten small publications, including The Galilee Hitch-Hiker, of which he says
It might be useful to note that these poems have a sense of "camp" about them, clearly manifested, and much more intriguing than what is now going down as wit. . . . But they are very subtle and literary, and function dryly. (59)
READ the full text of the reference to Brautigan.